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Over 30 artists in 20 locations. Shown, watercolor by Joy Makon, letter O on map.

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https://brooklyn-artisan.net/2017/11/12/73850/

Talk by Brooklyn artist/illustrator Nancy Doniger at #ArtSlope #PSWTArtists this Sunday, 1pm

This weekend! Nancy Doniger’s work and technique is interesting to learn about and her children’s book work is fun to see. Join Nancy, along with 21 other local artists for some surprisingly wonderful, affordable artwork to see and purchase.

Park Slope Windsor Terrace Artists

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Nancy Doniger ‘The Chase’ monotype with Akua inks on Masa Paper Nancy Doniger ‘The Chase’ monotype with Akua inks on Masa Paper

Park Slope Windsor Terrace Artists POP UP GALLERY

575 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, corner of 5th Ave & 16 St

Sunday Sept. 25 @ 1 pm.

Park Slope Windsor Terrace Artists, in conjunction with Art Slope, is pleased to present local artist Nancy Doniger, who will discuss her work as a children’s book illustrator and fine artist. Doniger will talk about ways that her fine-art process is both different from and similar to illustration art, what she enjoys about doing both, and her current focus on ‘hand pulled’ printmaking. On display will be samples of Doniger’s art work, including her published books.

Nancy Doniger is a Brooklyn artist/illustrator with works published in print and online for the New York Times, children’s books, businesses and nonprofits. Her fine art has been exhibited in NY, NJ, and MA. She has taught at…

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Art in the Slope: Hear Six Artists Speak About Their Work

 

Richard Barnet at his foundry.

440 Gallery artist Richard Barnet at his foundry.

This Sunday, February 29 at 4:40 p.m., the six members of artist-run 440 Gallery in Park Slope will speak about their work in a Q&A session. Gallery curator and fellow-artist Karen Gibbons will moderate this panel discussion about the current exhibition: New Members Show 2016.

Celebrating a 10-year anniversary this year, 440 Gallery is a neighborhood and family-centered storefront where one can explore art on all levels. One or two member artists are always on site during open hours (Thursday through Sunday) to talk about current exhibitions and upcoming events.

Painter Amy Weil works with encaustic media.

Upcoming events
(free, start at 4:40pm)
• Sunday Feb. 29: New Members Show Artist Talk
• Sunday March 6: Me, Myself and Eye: Andrew Drury Percussion—part of a monthly series of musical afternoons

Joy Makon will speak about her watercolor process.

Joy Makon will speak about her watercolor process.

Updated events as well as current and upcoming exhibitions are listed on the gallery’s website.

Location
440 Gallery is at 440 Sixth Avenue (9th Street and 6th Avenue) in Park Slope, Brooklyn. F, G, R trains.

Want To Start Your Own Artisanal Business?

READ INVESTOPEDIA’S SPECIAL REPORT on starting a business in New York City, filled with stories of Brooklyn business startups. You’ll see why Brooklyn and Queens are magnets for innovation and small-batch production as well as get important leads to New York City services that can untangle regulations and smooth your way. (Full disclosure: The Investopedia story is brought to you by founding folks at Brooklyn Artisan.)

Kickstarting Brooklyn: Hyperachievers

A Scott Terpin donut. His website has many, many more. Yum.

IN THE SINGULAR ECOSYSTEM that is Kickstarter, one will encounter many evolutionary dead ends—projects, visions and dreams that wither away unfunded. Then there are the mysterious campaigns that don’t just meet their targets, they blow by them and reach double, triple or stratospherically higher funding results. Why and how do these hyperachievers succeed, and can we learn any lessons by studying their success?

Here’s one that caught our eye at Brooklyn Artisan. Scott Teplin was creating his massive, quirky and highly detailed drawing called Big Canal and asked Kickstarter support for a hefty $4,500 to complete it. On the face of it, Scott is like many an artist—with a pen, a brush and a dream. But by the end of the campaign, his project was overfunded 11 times, garnering more than $49,000, which is a goodly chunk of the annual salary for a Brooklyn artist.

Big Canal, by Scott Terpin, a very successful Kickstarter project

Big Canal is one of those drawings with lots of quirky details that demand hours to explore—Where’s Waldo? without the people, Richard Scarry without the cute animals. What is the secret of its funding phenomenon? The campaign video stars Scott and, though mildly amusing, won’t win a Palme d’or. Maybe it’s the many photos on his Kickstarter page that engage the viewer in the overall process. Or it could be his suggestive marketing that positions the reward as a great poster for a kid’s room. Or maybe it just appealed to the random whim or previously undetected want of the Kickstarter audience.

One thing is certain: The man can sure draw donuts.

3rd Annual Brooklyn Holiday Book Fair Saturday, Dec. 6

THE OLD STONE HOUSE near the edge of J.J. Byrne playground in Park Slope is once again the historic venue for independent Brooklyn bookstores and booksellers to offer their choices to holiday shoppers,  including second-hand volumes sadly out of print. The New Yorker calls them “literary gems.” Look for booksellers Honey & Wax, Freebird Books, Faenwyl Bindery, and more than a half dozen others. Speaking of the New Yorker, at 2pm artist Maira Kalman will sign copies of her latest, My Favorite Things.  The Brooklyn Holiday Book Fair‘s hours are from 11am to 5pm. (See Brooklyn Artisan’s past coverage of this event)

Washington Park, Third Street (@Fifth Avenue), Park Slope. theoldstonehouse.org

Today! Open Studios Makes a Great Afternoon

WINDSOR TERRACE WAS OUR STARTING POINT yesterday, the first weekend day of the Open Studios event. (From Manhattan, take the F train to 15th Street and follow the map from the OS website.) Walk down Fuller Place, one of the most nearly perfect blocks in the area, with its contiguous front porches, to #41 where you’ll meet watercolor artist Joy Makon, who speaks interestingly and unpretentiously about her work and technique. After a long and successful career as a magazine, online and book cover designer, and columnist for Brooklyn Artisan, last year Makon began to bloom as a painter as well. Some of her pieces are for sale (several were snapped up yesterday),  and for a few, excellent giclée print reproductions can be bought at very reasonable prices.

From there, using our map, Brooklyn Artisan made our way down Windsor Place to 229A, to see the city-themed watercolors of Susan Greenstein,  an artist with 440 Gallery, and the rural landscapes of Phil DeSantis. Once again, the friendly and accessible artists were on hand to talk with you. (Many pieces were available with prices in the hundreds and some very good print reproductions were priced as modestly as $20.)

Simon Dinnerstein‘s house at 415 First Street (follow your map and stretch your legs a bit) serves as home, gallery and studio. You can hang your coat on the garden floor and wind your way through that floor, up to the parlor and then on to the top-floor studio, seeing his paintings and black and white graphite brush pieces all along the way. Dinnerstein is internationally known, especially for his The Fulbright Triptych, and locally beloved as a teacher as well as fine artist. Once again, the conversation was a wonderful supplement to the art. (His daughter, Simone Dinnerstein, is also known as a concert pianist.)

ALTOGETHER A SPECIAL AFTERNOON of visual adventures, good art talk, and a house tour as well! You can retrace our steps today or make your own itinerary from among the many more studios open today.

 

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